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Khapra Beetle baby problem becomes big problem for ASX company

Baby Bunting (ASX:BBN) temporarily close distribution centre on insect find.

Baby Bunting’s (ASX:BBN) Dandenong South Distribution Centre has been closed temporarily for inspection and treatment after finding insects in a shipping container.

The company is working closely with the Federal Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment (DAWE).

The shipping container held 320 units of Peg Perego Prima Pappa Follow Me highchairs.

The Khapra beetle is common to many parts of the world.

The beetle can travel in shipping containers and is attracted to cardboard packaging such as that used to transport the highchairs, not the product itself.

Normal operations are expected to progressively recommence from early next week.

All retail stores remain open and continue to trade, although there may be some minor disruption at some stores over the coming weeks.

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International biosecurity

Ports of Auckland to Eliminate Methyl Bromide Emissions

As part of Ports of Auckland’s ambition to be the most sustainable port in New Zealand, the company will require the total recapture of methyl bromide gas used for container fumigation by September 1, 2017, and for all cargoes by the end of the year.

Ports of Auckland CEO Tony Gibson said “Methyl bromide is a very effective pesticide and a key part of New Zealand’s biosecurity defence, but it is toxic to humans and depletes the ozone layer. By recapturing the gas after use we can improve safety, protect the environment and still keep unwanted pests out of New Zealand.”

At Ports of Auckland both containers and loose or ‘breakbulk’ cargo are fumigated by pumping the gas into a container or a tarpaulin covering the freight. After fumigation, the gas is vented to the atmosphere and it is this last stage that will be stopped.

Ports of Auckland has a history of innovation to reduce methyl bromide use. It is the first and only port in New Zealand to use heat treatment, instead of fumigation, for some cargoes. Heat treatment is not suitable for all cargoes (for example fresh fruit) so fumigation is still necessary.

“We are not a major user of methyl bromide, but when it comes to caring for our people and the environment we think it is important to address every issue even if it seems small. Every step we take to reduce our emissions takes us closer to our ambitious goal of having zero emissions by 2040,” concluded Tony Gibson.

For the original media release click here.